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Democratic presidential candidates call for Facebook's disruption


Since Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes has published an editorial defending the company's break-up to "create more competition in social media markets," the speech has been gaining support from Democratic candidates for the presidency of the United States. 

Since Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes has published an editorial defending the company's break-up to "create more competition in social media markets," the speech has been gaining support from Democratic candidates for the presidency of the United States.


One of the most "potent" voices to agree with Hughes was that of Senator and Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, who, even before the editorial, had promised to break the monopoly of Facebook, Amazon and Google if elected president in 2020. Last Thursday, Elizabeth took advantage of the rebound in Hughes' speech and reiterated that large technology companies "destroyed the competition, used our private information to make a profit, hurt small businesses, and stifled innovation."

On Monday, Senator Kamala Harris said that "we have to seriously consider" breaking Facebook - Hughes' editorial also advocated intervention by US regulators to reverse the acquisition of WhatsApp and Instagram . 

Mark Zuckerberg and Chris Hughes at Harvard University in 2004. (Photo: Rick Friedman / The New York Times)

If it depends on the politicians, the matter will not die soon enough. Today, former US Vice President Barack Obama , Joe Biden, said the breakup of large technology companies is "something we should look at seriously." 

Since Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes has published an editorial defending the company's break-up to "create more competition in social media markets," the speech has been gaining support from Democratic candidates for the presidency of the United States.


One of the most "potent" voices to agree with Hughes was that of Senator and Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, who, even before the editorial, had promised to break the monopoly of Facebook, Amazon and Google if elected president in 2020. Last Thursday, Elizabeth took advantage of the rebound in Hughes' speech and reiterated that large technology companies "destroyed the competition, used our private information to make a profit, hurt small businesses, and stifled innovation."

On Monday, Senator Kamala Harris said that "we have to seriously consider" breaking Facebook - Hughes' editorial also advocated intervention by US regulators to reverse the acquisition of WhatsApp and Instagram .

If it depends on the politicians, the matter will not die soon enough. Today, former US Vice President Barack Obama , Joe Biden, said the breakup of large technology companies is "something we should look at seriously."


Meanwhile, Facebook has been saying that dismembering the company is not the solution. In an editorial published by The New York Times two days after Hughes, Facebook's communications and policy director Nick Clegg argued that the company has significant competition and that a division would only worsen the problems surrounding freedom of expression and protection. 

Being big is not bad. A Success is not to be penalized. A Our success has given billions of people around the world access to new ways of communicating with each other. A Making money from ads means that we can provide these tools to people for free. Facebook should not be disrupted - but it must be blamed. "Anyone concerned about the challenges we face in an online world should try to hit the internet rules and not dismantle successful US companies," Clegg wrote.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave similar statements in an interview to reporters in France, where he traveled to meet with President Emmanuel Macron. "When I read what he wrote, my main reaction was' What he's proposing will do nothing to help solve these problems. '' I think if you care about democracy and elections then you want a company like Facebook, capable to invest billions of dollars a year and to build truly advanced tools to combat electoral interference. " 

(Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP)


In other words, Facebook argues that only a company of its size can afford the problems caused by a platform such as Facebook. The company also likes an approach found by France: for six months, the country's regulators worked within Facebook "monitoring their policies". In the end, the government released a 33-page report with suggestions on how Facebook's regulation should work.

The Zuckerberg-approved document recommends that "French authorities have more access to Facebook algorithms and more scope to audit the company's internal policies against hate speech," said Mathieu Rosemain and Gwénaëlle Barzic, who signed the report.

"If more countries can follow the example of France, this is likely to bring a more positive outcome to the world than some of the alternatives," Zuckerberg said in an interview at the Facebook office in Paris.

For France 2 Television, the CEO said new rules for the internet are needed to specify the responsibilities of companies and governments. "That's why we want to work with President Macron's team. We need a public process." 

Source: The Verge

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